The most famous prophecy – Ursula’s life

A collection of Mother Shipton’s latest prophecies was published at the end of the last century after a woman found and carefully transcribed them and managed to smuggle them out of the Mitchell Library in Sydney, Australia.

However, the original prophecies remained stored in a locked room, along with many other volumes of prophetic writings that were considered inappropriate.

Mother Shipton, for example, predicted the invention of the printing press and the mass spread of books, as well as the age of knowledge and enlightenment for even the poorest.

She was aware that people would move en masse to the cities and the decline of the countryside.

She saw cars, so-called horseless carriages, and she also predicted motor cars and trains and their accidents, and the emergence of the Church of England.

She saw floods and other natural disasters, as well as telephone, radio, television and the Internet.

She predicted the construction of massive dams and the bondage of waterfalls because she saw hydropower as one of the forms of energy that would illuminate the world.