How dangerous is the new virus in Africa

According to who, there is currently no vaccine or effective, approved treatment for the disease from the Marburg virus.

Experts are testing immunotherapy, monoclonal and antiviral antibodies.

For those who are hospitalized, the doctor usually provides supportive care, especially oral or intravenous rehydration, with specific symptomatic treatment to improve the chances of survival.

The U.S. government’s Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Agency granted additional funding to the Sabin Vaccine Institute for clinical trials of the vaccine in October.

Marburg is a virus that originates from fruit bats in Africa, spreading from person to person through respiratory fluids, causing “ghost-like” hemorrhagic disease with a mortality rate of almost 90%.

The World Health Organization (WHO) identified two deaths from the Marburg virus in Ghana on July 18.