Assange – “It’s a black day for press freedom’- Amnesty.

London gave the green light to the extradition of Julian Assange

“It’s a black day for press freedom and British democracy,” the website noted. Amnesty International’s concern.

The Wikileaks creator has 14 days to appeal the decision. “It’s a black day for press freedom and British democracy,” the website noted. Amnesty International’s concern.

In January 2021, the British justice system decided in his favor: Judge Vanessa Baraitser rejected the extradition on the grounds that the Australian, of fragile physical and psychological health, was at risk of committing suicide in the US prison system.

However, on April 20, a judge of the Court signed an extradition order and left the effectiveness of that measure in the hands of the British government.

“Anyone in this country who cares about freedom of expression should be deeply ashamed that the interior minister has approved the extradition of Julian Assange to the US, the country that planned his assassination,” the Wikileaks statement said.

The British government has given the green light to the extradition of Julian Assange to the United States on charges of alleged espionage.

The creator of Wikileaks, meanwhile, will have 14 days to file his appeal and prevent Washington from falling with everything for having leaked sensitive documentation 12 years ago. Amnesty International warned that the decision “puts the journalist at risk”.

London’s decision was announced by Home Secretary Priti Patel, nearly two months after a British court judge issued a surrender order for the Australian on April 20.

“Under the Extradition Act 2003, the interior minister must sign an extradition order if he finds no grounds to prohibit the order from being issued,” a spokesman for the ministry said.

“Julian did nothing wrong”

“It is a black day for press freedom and British democracy,” denounced the Wikileaks site, which through its lawyers anticipated that it will file an appeal.