Megalodon sharks can eat killer whales

This is the finding from an international study by the University of Zurich published.

Experts were able to conduct research thanks to a 3D model of a megalodon discovered in the 1860s.

Much of the animal’s spine is preserved in fossils after it died in Belgian waters at the age of 46 about 18 million years ago.

“Shark teeth are common fossils because of their hard composition that allows them to be stored in good condition,” said Jack Cooper, lead researcher at Swansea University.

“However, shark bones are composed of cartilage, so they are rarely fossilized.

Therefore, the megalodon shark spine at the Royal Belgian Academy of Natural Sciences is a one-of-a-kind fossil.”

The team, which includes scientists from Switzerland, the UK, the US, Australia and South Africa, first measured and scanned every spine, before reconstructing the entire spine.

They then grafted the spine into a 3D scan of the megalodon’s teeth from the United States.

The researchers completed the model by adding “flesh” around the skeleton, based on a 3D scan of the body of a white shark in South Africa.

“Weight is one of the most important characteristics of any animal.

For extinct animals, we can estimate body mass with modern digital 3D modeling.

Then establish the relationship between mass and many other biological features such as speed and energy consumption,” said John Hutchinson, professor at the Royal College of Veterinary Medicine in the UK.

“Weight is one of the most important characteristics of any animal. For extinct animals, we can estimate body mass with modern digital 3D modeling, then establish the relationship between mass and many other biological features such as speed and energy consumption,” said John Hutchinson, professor at the Royal College of Veterinary Medicine in the UK.

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